Another Study Shows Connection Between Dental/Periodontal Disease and Coronary Heart Disease

Another Study Shows Connection Between Dental/Periodontal Disease and Coronary Heart Disease

This brief, interesting article reports on another study showing a strong connection between dental and periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. When initial studies came out, some 20 years ago, linking these two seemingly very different diseases, there was a great deal of doubt. Medical science has now accepted the fact that inflammatory response caused by chronic dental disease affects other organ systems in the body. Cardiovascular disease is the most-studied of these cause/effect diseases. Research, however, has also linked dental disease to a wide variety of other diseases as well.

Connection Between Dental/Periodontal Disease and Coronary Heart Disease

New Study Reveals That Even Sugar-Free Drinks Can Cause Tooth Decay

New Study Reveals That Even Sugar-Free Drinks Can Cause Tooth Decay

This is a link to an interesting story about how even sugar-free beverages can promote tooth decay.  The key take-away from this is to be aware of how acidic your food and drink can be, and how acidic (low-pH) drinks can promote enamel loss, leading over time to decay.  These drinks include, among other things, dark colas (which often have phosphoric acid added), and most drinks that are citrus flavored — orange, lemon-lime, etc.  Even otherwise “healthy” drinks, such as orange juice, can be a culprit.  This doesn’t mean that you can never drink these beverages, it just means to be careful how often you do.  Rinsing afterward with water is helpful.

As always, it pays to read the label!

Sugar-Free Drinks Can Cause Tooth Decay

cross section of a tooth showing how tooth decay can set in
Sugar-free drinks can damage a healthy tooth.